Monthly Archives: April 2014

Tabletweaving Progress

After a few false starts I developed a pick-up system that worked well for me.  It’s slow going (as pick-up always is), but so far I am happy with the results.  The ground warp/weft is 8/2 tencel in a burgundy red, and the brocading weft is 6-strand DMC gold floss.  The pattern is from Anna Neuper’s Modelbuch.

Brocaded tabletweaving

After about two hours work

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Tabletweaving: Take 2

I tried my hand at tabletwoven doubleweave, but I didn’t like how it was going.  Instead, I’m going to try a brocaded pattern.

Tablet

A beginning

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Weave Sample: 2/1 Lozenge Twill

Lozenge twill is produced when the treadling direction is reversed as well as the warp threading. This produced alternate reversals in the twill direction and created diamond patterns in the textile.

2-1-Lozenge-Twill

2/1 lozenge twill


Weaving Draft

2-1-Lozenge-Twill

2/1 lozenge twill draft


When and where can this textile be found?

  • Commonly associated with 10th century Birka (Sweden)
  • 10th – 12th century Ireland in wool [2].
  • English textiles from the 10th century until the 13th century
  • Late 11th – 12th century in England in wool [3].
  • 12th – mid-14th century Sweden [1].

[1] Textile appearance and visual impression – Craft knowledge applied to archaeological textiles by Lena Hammarlund, Kathrine Vestergaard Pedersen (in NESAT IX)
[2] Aspects of the wool textiles from Viking Age Dublin by Frances Pritchard (in NESAT IV)
[3] Late Saxon Textiles from the City of London by Frances Pritchard

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Weave Sample: 2/1 Chevron Twill

Chevron twill is produced when the threading of the warp is changed, which reverses the direction of the twill diagonal. This creates a horizontal zig-zag effect.

2-1-Chevron-Twill

2/1 chevron twill


Weaving Draft

2-1-Chevron-Twill

2/1 chevron twill draft


When and where can this textile be found?

  • 7th c. Anglo Saxon (Sutton Hoo)
  • In wool in 8th century Germany
  • Mid-late 10th century in linen [1].
  • 11th – 14th century Norway [2].

[1] Textiles, Cordage and Raw Fibre from 16–22 Coppergate by Penelope Walton
[2] Medieval Textiles from Trondheim: An Analysis of Function by Ruth Iren Oien (in NESAT X)

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Cotehardie

Dame Helen has been kind enough to begin fitting me for a cotehardie pattern.

My inspiration is the dress here.  I love the squared off outer sleeves (and the veils).

Christine de Pisan instructs her son, circa 1413

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Weave Sample: 2/1 Ribbed Twill

A ribbed twill is produced when rows of 2/1 twill are alternated with rows of 1/2 twill. The difference in warp-faced and weft-faced weave structures produced a ribbed effect.

21RibbedTwill

2/1 ribbed twill (rippenkoper)


Weaving Draft

2-1-Ribbed-Twill

2/1 ribbed twill draft


When and where can this textile be found?

  • 2nd century (Roman Era) Egypt [2]
  • 5th – 7th century Northern Europe
  • 5th – 7th century Switzerland in linen and wool [1] (assuming 2/1 based on other sources)
  • 7th century Scandinavia
  • 11th century Latvia
  • 12th century Norway in wool [3].

[1] Early Medieval Costume in Switzerland by Antoinette Rast-Eicher (in NESAT VIII)
[2] A Matter of Material: Changes in Textiles from Roman Sites in Egypt’s Eastern Desert by Lise Bender Jorgensen (in An Tard)
[3] 12th Century Twills from Bergen, Norway by Ellen Schjølberg (in NESAT VI)

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Weave Sample: 2/1 Twill

In twill weaves, the weft is staggered to the right or the left, creating a diagonal effect. In 2/1 twill the weft goes under two warp threads, then over one, creating a warp-faced twill.

21Twill

2/1 twill


Weaving Draft

2-1-Twill

2/1 twill draft


When and where can this textile be found?

  • 1st – 4th century Western Roman Empire in wool [12].
  • 1st – 4th century Eastern Mediterranean (Roman Empire) [13]
  • Mid-late 3rd century (Roman Era) Spain [11].
  • 1st century to mid-3rd century (Roman Era) Egypt (in wool?) [4]
  • 2nd century (Roman Era) Czech Republic [7].
  • British textiles of the 5th through 7th century (though rare)
  • 10th – 12th century Ireland in wool [19].
  • Mid-late 10th century England in a plant fibre (linen?) [1].
  • Late 10th century England in wool [20].
  • 11th century Lithuania [6].
  • 11th-13th century Ireland in wool [18].
  • 11th – 14th century England in wool [2].
  • 11th – 14th century Norway [5].
  • Late 11th – 12th century in England in goat hair [20].
  • Mid-12th century in Pomerania in wool [21].
  • 12th century Norway in wool [17].
  • 12th – 13th century England in wool [1].
  • 12th – mid-14th century Sweden [10].
  • Late 13th century Finland in wool [3].
  • 14th century Norway in wool [8].
  • 14th century Denmark in wool [9].
  • Mid-14th century Scotland in wool [16].
  • First half of the 16 century Netherlands in wool [14].
  • Late 16th century Netherlands in silk warp/wool weft (weft-faced 1/2 twill) [14].
  • Occasionally in 16th century England
  • Late 16th century Ireland (Dublin) in half-silk (silk/wool or silk/linen) [15].

[1] Textiles, Cordage and Raw Fibre from 16–22 Coppergate by Penelope Walton Rogers
[2] Dress, dress accessories and personal ornament Textile and yarn by Penelope Walton Rogers (in Craft, Industry and Everyday Life: Finds from Medieval York)
[3] Finnish shipwreck textiles from the 13th–18th centuries AD by Krista Vajanto
[4] Team Work on Roman Textiles: The Mons Claudianus Textile Project by Lise Bender Jørgensen (in Purpureae Vestes)
[5] Medieval Textiles from Trondheim: An Analysis of Function by Ruth Iren Oien (in NESAT X)
[6] Textiles from the 3rd- 12th century AD Cremation Graves Found in Lithuania by Elvyra Peceliunaite-Bažiene (in NESAT X)
[7] Textile Remains on a Roman Bronze Vessel from Repov (Czech Republic) by Kristyna Urbanova and Helena Brezinova (in NESAT X)
[8] Medieval Clothing in Uvdal, Norway by Marianne Vedeler (in NESAT IX)
[9] A heap of forgotten textiles from the 14th century Danish fortress, Boringholm by Maj Ringgaard and Else Østergård (in NESAT IX)
[10] Textile appearance and visual impression – Craft knowledge applied to archaeological textiles by Lena Hammarlund, Kathrine Vestergaard Pedersen (in NESAT IX)
[11] Late Roman Textiles in the North of Spain (“Las Ermitas”, Vitoria) by Carmen Alfaro Giner (in NESAT VIII)
[12] The Romans in the West, 600 BC – AD 400 by John Peter Wild (in The Cambridge History of Western Textiles)
[13] The Eastern Mediterranean, 323 BC – AD 350 by John Peter Wild (in The Cambridge History of Western Textiles)
[14] Sixteenth-Century Textiles from Two Sites in Groningen, The Netherlands by Hanna Zimmerman (in NESAT VII)
[15] ‘The Apparel oft Proclaims the Man’: Late Sixteenth- and Early Seventeenth-Century Textiles from Bridge Street Upper, Dublin by Elizabeth Wincott Beckett (in NESAT VII)
[16] Early Textiles Found In Scotland by Audrey S. Henshall
[17] 12th Century Twills from Bergen, Norway by Ellen Schjølberg (in NESAT VI)
[18] Medieval Textiles from Waterford City by Elizabeth Wincott Heckett (in NESAT V)
[19] Aspects of the wool textiles from Viking Age Dublin by Frances Pritchard (in NESAT IV)
[20] Late Saxon Textiles from the City of London by Frances Pritchard
[21] Fabrics in Medieval Dress in Pomerania by Ann Rybarczyk

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Weave Sample: Rosette Twill

Rosette twill is a variation on 2/2 lozenge twill with doubled warp threads at 1 and 4.

Rosette

Rosette twill


Weaving Draft

Rosette

Rosette twill draft


When and where can this textile be found?

  • 6th – 7th century Germany. [1]

[1] The continental Germans by Lise Bender Jørgensen (in The Cambridge History of Western Textiles)

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Ottoman for the Woman

I’ve been toying with the idea of Ottoman garb (to match my husband) for some time now.  With our first Pennsic coming up is seemed like a good time to start.

Some useful information on the layers is here, and photos of the layers are here.

On my to do list is:

  • A gomlek (undershirt) or two.
  • Salwar (the trousers).  I already have one pair of these, but I might make another.
  • Chirka (fitted undertunic)
  • Entari (overcoat)

I found some fantastic fabric that I plan to use for the entari, and will base the colours of the rest of the outfit around that.

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Weave Sample: Sateen

Satin has a similar binding to a warp-faced twill, except that the pattern unit is at least five and the binding is spaced in such a way as to avoid a regular pattern (such as the diagonal pattern in twill).

Satin is commonly associated with silk, as the long floats are ideal for showing off this fibre. There are examples of mixed-fibre satin as well. The Clare Chasuble (late 13th century England) was made from satin with a silk warp and a cotton weft, most likely imported from Iran.
In the late 15th century the Italians were weaving ‘satin de Bruges’ which had a silk warp and a wool or linen weft.

Sateen

5 shaft sateen

Satin

5 shaft sateen (reverse)

*Note: Sateen is generally used to describe a weft-faced satin but has been used to mean other things (such as a satin made from cotton), so this term should be understood in context when reading.

When and where can this textile be found?

  • Satin weave was developed in China, and the earliest examples can be found there dating to the 8th century.
  • Introduced to England no later than the last quarter of the 13th century. [1]

[1] Textiles and Clothing, C.1150-c.1450 by Elisabeth Crowfoot, Frances Pritchard, Kay Staniland

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